The Evolution and Demise of the U.S. Tank Destroyer Doctrine in World War Two by Maj. Bryan E. Denny

The Evolution and Demise of the U.S. Tank Destroyer Doctrine in World War Two is a thesis presented to the Faculty of the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF MILITARY ART AND SCIENCE.  It was prepared by Bryan E. Denny, MAJ, US ARMY B.S., Appalachian State University, Boone, North Carolina, 1990.   The thesis was accepted on June 6th, 2003.

The following is the lead-in statement on the 86 page document:

"This study examines the U.S. Army’s use of tank destroyers in World War II, particularly the origins and evolution of tank destroyer doctrine, changes in training at the tank destroyer school at Camp Hood, and selection of weapons systems taken to the field. The author will punctuate these events with three distinct battles that tank destroyers played a predominate role in and evaluate their successes and failures."

1.) The Evolution and Demise of the U.S. Tank Destroyer Doctrine in World War Two