The following reference materials played a large part in providing information about my father's unit but also in giving me a much greater understanding of WWII and the men and women that served.  When I started my research, I really did not have a good understanding of anything relating to these subjects.  Now that I know how much research is required to write a good document on any subject, I take my hat off to the authors that have taken their time to preserve and document such a critical time in world history.

After The Battle Magazine - Issue No. 132

ATB-Issue-No.-132After The Battle's issue number 132 features an interesting article on Patton's Desert Training Center.  Established in March of 1942, the Desert Training Center would become a pivotal exercise area for troops heading to the gruelling climate and terrain of Northern Africa.  This 10,000 square mile would be expanded to 17,700 square miles, an area considerably larger than England, only to be closed in April of 1944.  By that time, over 300,000 troops had received training there.  As identified in the article, the 6th TD Group would be involved in specific maneuvers under White's IX Corps from June 27 until July 15th 1943.  The article also has a cute story about the camp morale officer, a donkey the soldiers named Eight Ball.

After The Battle has been in business for over 35 years providing history of all major conflicts. They produce both magazines and books and their "Now and Then" photo comparisons are a favorite of mine. I have purchased a number of their issues. 

After The Battle has their own website, www.afterthebattle.com with a free down-loadable index of all their issues, which makes finding a particular subject relatively easy. Purchasing the issues must be done through their U.S. importer, RZM Imports.  You can find them at www.rzm.com.  Issue costs are reasonable.

After The Battle Magazine - Issue No. 25

ATB-Issue-No.-25After The Battle's issue number 25 features a nice article on the preservation of a late model M-10 Tank Destroyer.  The TD was found in a southern England scrapyard, overgrown since the end of the war and hemmed in by a number of other vehicles. The restoration project did not look too promising at first.  With some large batteries obtained in France, the unit's new owner, Peter Gray, Military Vehicle Conservation Group founder, was able to start its twin GM 6 cylinder engines.  Within a few days, the TD was removed from the site and on display at a D-Day show in the area.  Ultimately, the M-10 was shown and used in both TV and movies. A really nice effort for a great piece of history.

After The Battle has been in business for over 35 years providing history of all major conflicts. They produce both magazines and books and their "Now and Then" photo comparisons are a favorite of mine.  I have purchased a number of their issues. 

After The Battle has a website, www.afterthebattle.com, with a free down-loadable index of all their issues, which makes finding a particular subject relatively easy.  Purchasing the issues must be done through their U.S. importer, RZM Imports.  You can find them at www.rzm.com.  Issue costs are reasonable.